Native Wedding Lei   When challenged with an all native Hawaiian lei series, I reached out to many aunties, uncles, farmers, and the 'aina.  This is a collection of lei for a wedding, a variety of plants are used, some rarer than others, but all powerful in their own way.    Including, but not limited to:  ʻŌhiʻa lehua,   Metrosideros polymorpha , Palapalai,  Microlepia strigosa,   Hibiscus kokio,  ʻŌhā,  Clermontia hawaiiensis , 'Iliahi,  Santalum freycinetianum,  the endemic sandalwood, Pukiawe,  Leptecophylla tameiameiae , ʻŌhelo ʻai,  Vaccinium reticulatum , ʻAʻaliʻi,  Dodonaea viscosa

Native Wedding Lei

When challenged with an all native Hawaiian lei series, I reached out to many aunties, uncles, farmers, and the 'aina.  This is a collection of lei for a wedding, a variety of plants are used, some rarer than others, but all powerful in their own way.  

Including, but not limited to: ʻŌhiʻa lehua, Metrosideros polymorpha, Palapalai, Microlepia strigosa, Hibiscus kokio, ʻŌhā, Clermontia hawaiiensis, 'Iliahi, Santalum freycinetianum, the endemic sandalwood, Pukiawe, Leptecophylla tameiameiae, ʻŌhelo ʻai, Vaccinium reticulatum, ʻAʻaliʻi, Dodonaea viscosa

Haleakala Haku    This lei features a medley of native Hawaiian plants all gathered from the slopes of Haleakala.    Some plants include: 'Iliahi,  Santalum freycinetianum,  the endemic sandalwood, Pukiawe,  Leptecophylla tameiameiae , ʻŌhelo ʻai,  Vaccinium reticulatu,  ʻAʻaliʻi,  Dodonaea viscosa

Haleakala Haku

This lei features a medley of native Hawaiian plants all gathered from the slopes of Haleakala.  

Some plants include: 'Iliahi, Santalum freycinetianum, the endemic sandalwood, Pukiawe, Leptecophylla tameiameiae, ʻŌhelo ʻai, Vaccinium reticulatu, ʻAʻaliʻi, Dodonaea viscosa

Give Me Some Moa   Moa,  Psilotum nudum,  a native fern found growing in some of the most unlikely places can pop up out of nowhere.  Moa has been used in lei making for centuries. Can be made into a haku lei, bracelet, necklace, or used in arrangements.  

Give Me Some Moa

Moa, Psilotum nudum, a native fern found growing in some of the most unlikely places can pop up out of nowhere.  Moa has been used in lei making for centuries. Can be made into a haku lei, bracelet, necklace, or used in arrangements.  

Open ended Acacia koa lei for a groom, in combination with argenteum leaves. 

Open ended Acacia koa lei for a groom, in combination with argenteum leaves. 

Naupaka Lovers Lei         Naupaka,  Scaevola taccada,  is an indigenous plant to Hawai'i and one of the most widely used native plants in landscapes all over the islands.  This lei is using the delicate white to purple flowers as well as the berries it produces after flowering.  The Hawaiian legend associated with this plant is below, though only using the Naupaka Kahawai it represents the joining of two lovers in an endless circle of love.     The Legend:       In ancient times, one version goes, there was a beautiful Hawaiian princess known as Naupaka. One day, the villagers noticed that Naupaka looked very sad. They told her parents, who approached Naupaka and asked her what was troubling her.     “I have fallen in love with a man named Kaui,” replied the princess. “But Kaui is not of noble birth—he is a commoner.” According to Hawaiian tradition, it was strictly forbidden for members of royalty to marry people from the common ranks.      Distressed, Naupaka and Kaui traveled long and far, seeking a solution to their dilemma. They climbed up a mountain to see a kahuna who was staying at a heiau (temple). Alas, he had no clear answer for the young lovers. “There is nothing I can do,” he told them, “but you should pray. Pray at this heiau.”     So they did. And as they prayed, rain began to fall. Their hearts torn by sorrow, Naupaka and Kaui embraced for a final time. Then Naupaka took a flower from her ear and tore it in half, giving one half to Kaui. “The gods won’t allow us to be together,” she said. “You go live down by the water, while I will stay up here in the mountains.”     As the two lovers separated, the naupaka plants that grew nearby saw how sad they were. The very next day, they began to bloom in only half flowers.     There are different versions of the Naupaka legend, but all carry the same unhappy theme: lovers that are separated forever, one banished to the mountains, the other to the beach. 

Naupaka Lovers Lei

     Naupaka, Scaevola taccada, is an indigenous plant to Hawai'i and one of the most widely used native plants in landscapes all over the islands.  This lei is using the delicate white to purple flowers as well as the berries it produces after flowering.  The Hawaiian legend associated with this plant is below, though only using the Naupaka Kahawai it represents the joining of two lovers in an endless circle of love.  

The Legend:
     In ancient times, one version goes, there was a beautiful Hawaiian princess known as Naupaka. One day, the villagers noticed that Naupaka looked very sad. They told her parents, who approached Naupaka and asked her what was troubling her.
    “I have fallen in love with a man named Kaui,” replied the princess. “But Kaui is not of noble birth—he is a commoner.” According to Hawaiian tradition, it was strictly forbidden for members of royalty to marry people from the common ranks.
     Distressed, Naupaka and Kaui traveled long and far, seeking a solution to their dilemma. They climbed up a mountain to see a kahuna who was staying at a heiau (temple). Alas, he had no clear answer for the young lovers. “There is nothing I can do,” he told them, “but you should pray. Pray at this heiau.”
    So they did. And as they prayed, rain began to fall. Their hearts torn by sorrow, Naupaka and Kaui embraced for a final time. Then Naupaka took a flower from her ear and tore it in half, giving one half to Kaui. “The gods won’t allow us to be together,” she said. “You go live down by the water, while I will stay up here in the mountains.”
    As the two lovers separated, the naupaka plants that grew nearby saw how sad they were. The very next day, they began to bloom in only half flowers.
    There are different versions of the Naupaka legend, but all carry the same unhappy theme: lovers that are separated forever, one banished to the mountains, the other to the beach. 

ʻŌhā, Clermontia    Clermontia hawaiiensis , known as ʻŌhā is a lobeliad.  This endemic plant has early uses in Hawai'i.  The sticky latex was used in bird catching, where a few feathers at a time would be picked and used for feather cloaks, capes, helmets, lei, and kāhili.  This plant is a source of food for the native honeycreepers as well has early Hawaiians, who would boil the leaves and eat the berries fresh.  

ʻŌhā, Clermontia

Clermontia hawaiiensis, known as ʻŌhā is a lobeliad.  This endemic plant has early uses in Hawai'i.  The sticky latex was used in bird catching, where a few feathers at a time would be picked and used for feather cloaks, capes, helmets, lei, and kāhili.  This plant is a source of food for the native honeycreepers as well has early Hawaiians, who would boil the leaves and eat the berries fresh.